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Author Archives: wendyang

Wendy Angulo is a New York City born Latina, raised in Caracas, Venezuela. Wendy is a mother, writer, lawyer and the founder of Wendy Angulo Productions, an organization whose goal is to support, encourage, and promote poetry and visual arts in the borough of Queens. Wendy, re-discovered her love for writing in the summer of 2011 after attending a spoken word event in Queens. She then joined the New York City Latina Writers Group where she has been an active member and has taken on the role as the organization’s Program Director. Wendy is an essayist who is currently working on her Memoir. She has read her work at several venues throughout New York City, including Nuyorican’s Poets Cafe, East Harlem Cafe, Sankofa Sisterhood, Camaradas and has been published in the online journal Mom Egg Review; she is a 2016 VONA alum and the sole creator/curator and producer of Canvas of Words, an art and poetry showcase that birthed of Wendy’s desire to bring the arts back to her beloved borough of Queens. Wendy continues to scout for new talent and build new connections to perpetuate the arts and strengthen the literary community.

Coming Home Colombia, Interview with DJ EFN

As some of you might know by some of my Instagram posts, I am a huge fan of DrinkChamps the weekly podcast hosted by Queens own N.O.R. E and Miami Hip Hop Pioneer Dj EFN. Today, I have the pleasure to chop it up with DJ EFN about his award-winning documentary series Coming Home, where DJ EFN and his Crazy Hood crew ... Read More »

The Woke Series, Interview with Creator Glenis Hunter

A few weeks ago my friend Nia Thomas sent me a screenshot of The Woke Series Instagram page and suggested I interviewed its creator and help spread the word through my platform about this project. Right away I said yes! So after a quick introduction via text, I set up an interview with Glenis Hunter and today she will share ... Read More »

Checking my Respectability Politics by Vanessa Mártir

The first time my sister Dee said it to me, I was visiting from the prestigious boarding school I had received a four year scholarship to attend. We were arguing about I don’t know what. We’ve always argued. As kids, as adults, long after I’d left our mother’s house, leaving her behind to deal with what I couldn’t and didn’t ... Read More »

I Don’t Live There by Richa Pokhrel

Shame is a common feeling that a South Asian woman like me experiences over and over throughout our lifetime. Since my birth, this emotion has held on to me like a light scar that never fades. I’ve shaken it off a few times like a wet dog, but somehow it creeps back into my life. I’ve dealt with a fair ... Read More »

Breaking Cycles by Rachel Wendy Cuevas

Plenty of people are oblivious to the many diverse forms of domestic abuse. It can be deemed physical, verbal, emotional, psychological or sexual. According to The Center for Disease Control and Prevention: every month 20 people are physically abused by an intimate partner in the United States. Lugubriously enough, domestic violence doesn’t just transpire between romantic partners. An immediate family ... Read More »

Born Just in Time by Joan Becht-Willette

     I always felt like I should have been born a boy. Males were always valued more, wherever I went. So, I flew under the radar, dimmed my light, my intelligence, my creativity, and independence. It was expected back in the day, and I wonder if this is still the case.     I grew up in the middle of two ... Read More »

Breaking the Colonial Cycle and Reclaiming my Voice by JF Seary

You sound white! You speak so well. You’re very articulate. As I was coming up in the world,  a brown-skinned Bronx born Boricua at a time when my appearance and the sounds coming out of my mouth didn’t compute for many people. I’ll never truly know what they expected to hear, but I remember what it felt like to receive ... Read More »

In Honor of Growing Old for Marsha Moore by Nancy Mercado

Old age isn’t so bad when you consider the alternative. ~Maurice Chevalier   I lost my best friend when we were 32. We met when 5, in kindergarten. Marsha Moore was a wonderfully tall fat Black girl who treated me like her sister. We were sisters. Marsha didn’t get the chance to grow old. Her life in this world was ... Read More »

A Forbidden Desire by Gitanjali

1989 I am eight years old. I am standing in my bedroom looking up at the black woolly hair that crowns my mother’s head. We live in a bungalow in a largely white, working-class suburb of Western Sydney. My bedroom window looks out onto a stiff, spiky lawn, permanently kept yellow-green as the grass fails, year after year, to recover ... Read More »

Terminations: One by Lynne DeSilva-Johnson

1997-2017:: in which I am a dystopia As the unexamined traumas lodged in my muscles, bones, and organs metastasize into a laundry list of erratic pain, illness, and life-altering shifts, I find myself in one waiting room after another, filling out the same information (and lack thereof): what are your current symptoms? how long have you been experiencing these symptoms? ... Read More »